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Is Snorting Concerta a Safe Way to Consume the Drug?

Just taking a Concerta pill without a prescription is considered misuse. Snorting it is another popular way people use Concerta for recreational reasons. It is a strong sign that someone is addicted to the drug.

There is no safe way to snort Concerta.

Why Is Concerta Used?

People with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often require additional help so they can concentrate better. Medication such as methylphenidate can help individuals who have been diagnosed with ADHD.

Most people know methylphenidate by its brand names, Ritalin and Concerta.

Concerta is known as a “study drug,” and it is known to be misused at high schools and universities. The Conversation published a report in 2016 that explains the risks of this trend on youth.

The report highlights several “study drugs,” including Concerta, Ritalin, and Adderall. There are some commonalities among people who use study drugs recreationally.

  • Up to 90 percent of students who misused Adderall were likely to binge on alcohol
  • Many had a low GPA.
  • University students who misuse study drugs tend to be in a fraternity or sorority.
  • Many who misuse study drugs are white non-Hispanic males.

Students may believe that misusing study drugs such as Concerta are harmless because they are used to treat a very real condition. Using any drug that is not prescribed to you is abuse, and it comes with serious risks.

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Concerta is an extended-release medication meant to be taken once daily. It has a high potential for misuse, and it is possible to overdose on it.

Basics of Concerta

Since Concerta is a stimulant, it may have side effects even when used under a doctor’s supervision.

  • Insomnia
  • Appetite suppression
  • Headaches
  • Stomach pain

Some children should not take Concerta. The medication should be avoided by kids who:

  • Struggle with anxiety
  • Have Tourette’s syndrome
  • Have seizures
  • Take MAO inhibitors (antidepressants)

People who take Concerta for recreational reasons may not have this information. They put themselves at risk if they struggle with these conditions and misuse Concerta.

How Snorting Affects the Body and Brain

Snorting any drug can cause many negative effects.

While Concerta can interact with many supplements and medications, snorting makes these negative interactions worse. This is because Concerta is meant to release its effects over 12 hours. When a person snorts Concerta, everything in the tablet is released quickly.

Some side effects of snorting Concerta include:

  • Faster heartbeat
  • Suppressed appetite
  • Inability to sleep
  • Rise in body temperature

In addition, snorting anything is harmful to the nose.

The intensity at which a drug is released into the bloodstream could cause various negative effects:

  • Shaking
  • Dizziness
  • Constipation
  • Coma
  • Seizures
  • Heart failure
  • Death

Staying Safe

A 2012 study published in Brain and Behavior states that athletes may take study drugs so they can do better in sports. Most students simply do not know enough to make an educated decision to abstain from taking Concerta without a prescription.

The study also found that students are likely to misuse Concerta and other study drugs to deal with stress and improve their study habits. The use of study drugs is not correlated with higher performance in school, however.

The only way to truly stay safe is to abstain from using Concerta for recreational reasons.

Studies are still being conducted on the total impact of drugs such as Concerta on the brain. At the moment, science says Concerta can help people with ADHD behave better, and it is safe for this demographic to use.

Overdose Risks

In May 2018, Reuters reported that more children in the United States were overdosing on ADHD prescription medications. Most cases were not fatal, but three people died because they overdosed on medication meant for people with ADHD.

A 2017 report on VICE described how counterfeit pills are a new threat. According to VICE, 2017 was a big year for counterfeit prescription pills of various kinds.

Taking fake versions of Concerta could increase the risk of overdose because:

  • Many counterfeit prescription pills contain other substances, such as fentanyl, which can be deadly in incredibly small amounts.
  • Counterfeit pills may be too strong for the person taking them, containing much higher doses than stated.

Snorting a fake version of Concerta that contains too much of the medication or that is tainted with other substances could cause a person to overdose and even die.

Since snorting a drug delivers the full force of the substance quickly to the brain, its effects are felt intensely. This means overdose can take hold rapidly.

Sources

(June 2018) Prescription Stimulants. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/prescription-stimulants

(March 2016) ADHD medication overdose and misuse: the NSW Poisons Information Centre experience, 2004–2014. The Medical Journal of Australia. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2016/204/4/adhd-medication-overdose-and-misuse-nsw-poisons-information-centre-experience

(March 2018) Why Is Snorting Drugs Dangerous? Verywell Mind. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-snorting-drugs-22107

(January 2015) How to Snort Concerta + Experience of preparing it. Reddit. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.reddit.com/r/Drugs/comments/2nkjq5/how_to_snort_concerta_experience_of_preparing_it/

(May 2016) The hefty price of ‘study drug’ misuse on college campuses. The Conversation. Retrieved February 2019 from https://theconversation.com/the-hefty-price-of-study-drug-misuse-on-college-campuses-59340

(October 2017) Mitigating risks of students use of study drugs through understanding motivations for use and applying harm reduction theory: a literature review. Harm Reduction Journal. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5639593/

(June 2012) Study Drugs: The Next Teen Addiction? Psychology Today. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-moment-youth/201206/study-drugs-the-next-teen-addiction

(December 2017) Fake Prescription Pills Are a Threat to Our Generation. VICE. Retrieved February 2019 from https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/9knyez/fake-prescription-pills-are-a-threat-to-our-generation

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